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IWTC WOMEN’S GLOBALNET #340

OUTCOME OF THE 41ST SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN

August 28, 2008

Helena Gronberg

 

  1. CEDAW COMMITTEE ELECTION RESULTS
  2. OUTCOME OF 41st SESSION OF CEDAW
  3. NEXT CEDAW MEETINGS
  4. RESOURCES FOR WORKING WITH CEDAW

 

1. CEDAW COMMITTEE ELECTION RESULTS

On 30 July 2008 States parties to the Convention of the Elimination of all Forms Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) elected the following candidates to fill the eleven positions on the CEDAW Committee that will become vacant on 31 December 2008:

- Ms. Nicole Ameline ( France )
- Ms. Magalys Arocha Dominguez ( Cuba)
- Ms. Violet Tsisiga Awori ( Kenya)
- Ms. Barbara Evelyn Bailey ( Jamaica)
- Mr. Niklas Bruun ( Finland)
- Ms. Indira Jaising ( India)
- Ms. Soledad Murillo de la Vega (Spain)
- Ms. Silvia Pimentel ( Brazil)
- Ms. Victoria Popescu ( Romania)
- Ms. Zohra Rasekh ( Afghanistan)
- Ms. Xiaoqiao Zou ( China)

They will serve a four-year term beginning January 1, 2009.  All Committee members serve in their personal capacities, and not as representatives of the States parties.
For a full list of nominees, go to http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cedaw/docs/CEDAW.SP.2008.3.pdf

 

The CEDAW Committee, composed of 23 experts on women’s rights from around the world, is responsible for reviewing the country reports submitted by the countries that are party to the treaty. 185 countries are party to the treaty, the United States being the only industrialized country that has not ratified the convention.

 

2. OUTCOME OF 41st SESSION OF CEDAW

The countries examined at the most recent CEDAW session that convened in New York from June 30 to July 18, 2008 were Finland, Iceland, Lithuania, Nigeria, Slovakia, United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen. NGOs from all of the countries submitted shadow reports, alternative reports submitted by NGOs to supplement or present alternative information to the periodic government reports.

For shadow reports, see: http://www.iwrawap.org/resources/shadow_reports.htm

 

In addition to making recommendations to States regarding issues to which the Committee believes countries should pay special attention, the Committee made progress on two general recommendations: migrant women and article 2 of the Convention, which lays out measures for states to pursue a policy of eliminating discrimination against women.

Country specific concluding remarks can be found at http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cedaw/cedaws41.htm 

 

3. NEXT CEDAW MEETINGS

As of January 2008 the responsibilities of servicing the CEDAW Committee were transferred from the Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW) in New York to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) in Geneva. While most CEDAW meetings will take place in Geneva, some meetings will continue to be held in New York.

 

The next (42nd) session of the CEDAW Committee will be held in Geneva from October 20 to November 7, 2008. The countries to be examined are Bahrain, Belgium, Cameroon, Canada, Ecuador, El Salvador, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Mongolia, Myanmar, Portugal, Slovenia and Uruguay.

To read government reports see http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cedaw/cedaws42.htm.

Shadow reports will be available on the IWRAW Asia Pacific website at http://www.iwraw-ap.org/resources/shadow_reports.htm by mid-end September.

 

The 43rd session will be held in Geneva in January 2009. The countries to be examined are Armenia, Bhutan, Dominica, Germany, Guatemala, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Israel, Liberia, Libya Jamahiriya and Rwanda.

 

4. RESOURCES FOR WORKING WITH CEDAW

- The Circle of Empowerment, Twenty-five Years of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women is a collection of essays and personal reflections from individuals who have served on the CEDAW Committee. It introduces readers to the issues and activism that surround the convention as one of the most important human rights tools ever created. The Circle of Empowerment reveals the profound impact the convention has had on women's lives around the world. With examples and moving reminiscences from Japan to Tunisia to the Caribbean and beyond, this readable collection addresses CEDAW's impact on women in Islam, labor markets, migration, violence against women, trafficking, women in politics, and more. The publication is available through Women Ink.at https://id3410.securedata.net/womenink.org/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=473

 

- International Women’s Rights Asia Pacific.  A Resource Guide Our Rights Are Not Optional, A Resource Guide is an easy-to-use resource guide that provides information and materials that can be employed to strengthen efforts led by women’s rights advocates and governments that are working to promote effective implementation of CEDAW at national level.

The publication is also available through Women Ink.: https://id3410.securedata.net/womenink.org/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=323

 

-  Domestic Application of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Potential and Actuality , by Anuradha Rao and the International Women’s Rights Action Watch, reviews the principles by which states are implementing CEDAW and provides an overview of state obligation to the treaty, and how it can be woven into national laws and policies in order to have a practical impact.

Read the analysis at:

http://www.wccpenang.org/wcc/images/legaldocs/wluml%20-%20anuradha%20-%20domestic%20application%20of%20cedaw.pdf

 

- The International Women’s Rights Project at the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria in Canada provides a comparative analysis of CEDAW on national systems. The pilot study was developed and carried out in ten countries to gather qualitative and quantitative data from the "grassroots" in order to develop better measurements of the implementation of human rights guarantees from the perspective of women's rights activists.

Find out more at: http://www.iwrp.org/

 

- The Bora Laskin Law Library at the University of Toronto provides links to several sites related to the history, the drafting and the discussion of CEDAW over the years as well as enforcement mechanisms.

Get more information at: http://www.lawlib.utoronto.ca/Resguide/women2.htm#II

 

 

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